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Moving Pictures  |  August 25, 2013

And After the Renovation!  (check my Facebook photos for all the in-between). 

Moving Pictures  |  August 25, 2013

April 1 2013 - We bought a house! (and managed to close on our anniversary). It’s pretty 70s-tastic, so it necessitated a big ol’ renovation!

Thoughts Miscellany  |  August 25, 2013

Yes I suck at Updating

Not that anyone reads this anyway, but for posterity sake … 

We’ve lived in Colorado for two years, already. The time flies by, but more than anything I am the happiest I’ve ever been. I don’t think I ever really realized just how miserable I was in New York, and how badly it impacted everything from my perception of others to my general health and wellbeing. But two years in such a better place have really made things so much clearer. Since moving here: 

  • Zach has been able to work on his writing full time. 
  • The Mighty Ants didn’t survive as well as I’d hoped, but I have a great new job that I really enjoy. 
  • We cleaned up all our debt 
  • I lost 80-90 pounds, so far
  • I rediscovered a love for being outside and have been camping, hiking, and skiing. 
  • We finally bought a house … and renovated the crap out of it. 
  • We have friends we enjoy and that enjoy us
  • We found a church that hasn’t kicked us out (yet). 
  • We are just generally happy. 

Pics to come of the house

Photographic  |  August 16, 2012
For @ZoomIsland

For @ZoomIsland

(Source: maviedanstesyeuxbleus, via samkinsman)

Found On The Web  |  July 17, 2012

Clients From Hell: A client asked for a ‘complete and total’ overhaul of her existing...

clientsfromhell:

A client asked for a ‘complete and total’ overhaul of her existing designs…

Client: Your designs are terrible. Why are they so different from the previous revisions?

Me: Okay, so you would like for us to work off of the previous designs now?

Client: Yes! But you need to change the layout…

I’ve had this exact conversation with one or more of my clients.

Photographic  |  May 4, 2012
tatteredcover:

Brentwood Library. Amazing entryway!
wordpainting:
amandaonwriting:

Methinks I shall build this in my next home.

tatteredcover:

Brentwood Library. Amazing entryway!

wordpainting:

amandaonwriting:

Methinks I shall build this in my next home.

Found On The Web  |  March 20, 2012
Thoughts Miscellany  |  March 18, 2012

Homeless Hotspots Are A Damn Good Idea

So there’s been a lot of kerfuffle this week about the Homeless Hotspots at SXSW. The idea is basically to give homeless people wireless wifi devices via which they can then sell access to attendees of the music/technology festival. The people are $20 a day by the company and the suggested donation for access is $2 for 20 minutes. 

The program upset a lot of people. They said it was dystopian fiction come to life: when our technology can’t keep up we turn the disadvantaged into infrastructure. Exploiting the poor! Encourage them to “beg” for $2 per connection. They called it reducing people to nothing but a hotspot. They called it selfish gall.

And these are probably the same people who would otherwise ignore the homeless on the streets of Austin while they bitch about not being able to get on the Internet anytime they want to tweet about their shoes. Waaa waaa waaa.

The idea was born of an advertising agency based in NY with English leadership. In the UK, it’s not uncommon to see the homeless population selling “The Big Issue” newspapers on the street for about £2. It’s not exploitive, it’s how they survive. It’s how they make money. And it pays a helluvalot more than standing at the street corner with a cardboard sign. 

We don’t read newspapers anymore. We use the Internet. And at big events, or in public spaces, or big cities, there isn’t always enough WiFi to go around. I remember in New York, at Bryant Park, Google sponsored free public WiFi throughout the park. Access sucked. It was slow and spotty. It rarely worked. The choices were suffer a frustrating connection, or go pay for access at Starbucks instead of sitting outside on a beautiful day. Public WiFi is a long way off from being ubiquitously useful. 

So I think Homeless Hotspots are a damn good idea. They bring the homeless population out of the shadows. People can’t ignore people as easily when they’re interacting with them to get to their precious Facebook feeds. 

And it’s not exploitive. These people are being paid. At minimum $20 a day, full profit. That’s likely more than they get paid standing on the corner. That buys meals, toiletry supplies, some clothes at Goodwill. And on top of that baseline, they are out there selling services and making money. This is basic capitalism, and the capitalists are bitching about it. 

These devices can typically support 5 simultaneous connections at a time. Let’s assume one particular fellow is really efficient at selling the service. At $2 per 15 minute connection, he can make $40 an hour. Even if they only sell it to one person at a time they’re still making $8 an hour - which is more than the minimum wage in Texas.

And it’s 100% profit. The folks in the UK have to pay for their papers before they can sell them. These guys are given the infrastructure to go help themselves for free. 

Someone tell me why this isn’t an ideal model for helping the homeless moving forward? Explain to me why this shouldn’t be done on the 16th Street Mall in Denver or Pearl Street in Boulder or Times Square or Bryant Park in NYC. 

My biggest issue with the whole thing is that despite the fact it’s a good idea doing good for people, it really was a publicity stunt for the advertising agency. It created buzz, and is therefore a success. The human benefit is really an unintended consequence, and they won’t be continuing the program after SXSW. In that respect, the detractors are right, the agency folks are rather smarmy. However, the idea is brilliant, and it would be fantastic if there were a way to actually make it a doable program outside of the microcosm of Austin’s HipsterLand. 

Thoughts Miscellany  |  March 10, 2012

Yay Spring!

Winter, I love you. We had some great times. Skiing again after 10+ years was phenom. And you really are a much more pleasant guest here in CO than you ever were in NYC. Looking forward to your visit next year, really, but frankly, get the hell out. Springtime is here and she and I are gonna gets our freak on. 

Monday and Tuesday were absolutely beautiful and I totally got spring fever. Zach and I bailed on work for a couple hours and hung out reading on a coffee shop patio downtown. It was very nice indeed. And then it got cold again. And we got a little snow and ice. And I got sad. But now it’s warm again, like, mid-60s and 70s for the next week at least. And now I’m happy again. Apparently fickle is my thing this year. 

Back in NY Spring meant relief from the cold dark dreary gray never ending winter. It was about 2 weeks of beautiful lounging in Central Park before the humidity came, and summer stormed in, and the next 6 months were sweaty and gross and we longed for fall. But in Colorado, it means something entirely different. It means long (dry) walks with the dog, it means hiking, and camping, and generally enjoying being outside without having to swelter or dig beach sand out of one’s ass. 

I’m positively aching to get outside. This year is going to be all about hiking and camping. I already have spiffy new proper hiking boots. I’ve gotten a whole bunch of guidebooks about trails and campsites in Colorado, and have been refreshing all my old boy scout knowledge about living outdoors too. I’m seriously stoked. Yay Spring! 

Photographic  |  March 9, 2012
I tell her to lay down and she goes to pout in a box.  (Taken with instagram)

I tell her to lay down and she goes to pout in a box. (Taken with instagram)

Photographic  |  March 6, 2012
Right there with you, Marigold. (via Questionable Content)

Right there with you, Marigold. (via Questionable Content)

Photographic  |  March 2, 2012
user:

James: I got a fan letter, from a young lady. It was a suicide note. So I uh, I called her. I said, ‘Hey this is Jimmy Doohan. Scotty of Star Trek.’ I said, ‘I’m doing a con in Indianapolis. I want you to be there.’ I saw her and, I couldn’t believe what I saw. She was definitely suicidal. Somebody had to help her somehow. And obviously she wasn’t going to the right people. Anyhow I said, ‘I’m doing a convention two weeks from now in St. Louis.’ Two weeks from then and something and then she came to New York. And she was able to afford to go to these places. And this went on for two or three years. Maybe eighteen times. And all I did was talk to her, positive things. And then all of a sudden, ZIP. Nothing. I didn’t hear anything I didn’t know what was happening cause I never saved her address. Eight years later I get a letter saying, ‘I do want to thank you so much for what you did for me, because I just got my masters in electronic engineering.’ You know, to me, thats the best thing I have ever done in my life. And it brings tears to my eyes every time I even talk about the story.

user:

James: I got a fan letter, from a young lady. It was a suicide note. So I uh, I called her. I said, ‘Hey this is Jimmy Doohan. Scotty of Star Trek.’ I said, ‘I’m doing a con in Indianapolis. I want you to be there.’ I saw her and, I couldn’t believe what I saw. She was definitely suicidal. Somebody had to help her somehow. And obviously she wasn’t going to the right people. Anyhow I said, ‘I’m doing a convention two weeks from now in St. Louis.’ Two weeks from then and something and then she came to New York. And she was able to afford to go to these places. And this went on for two or three years. Maybe eighteen times. And all I did was talk to her, positive things. And then all of a sudden, ZIP. Nothing. I didn’t hear anything I didn’t know what was happening cause I never saved her address. Eight years later I get a letter saying, ‘I do want to thank you so much for what you did for me, because I just got my masters in electronic engineering.’ You know, to me, thats the best thing I have ever done in my life. And it brings tears to my eyes every time I even talk about the story.

Photographic  |  March 2, 2012
Photographic  |  February 29, 2012
Taken with instagram

Taken with instagram

Thoughts Miscellany  |  February 25, 2012

New Rules for Dinner Parties

Whenever you go to someone’s house for dinner, a party, whatever, it’s polite to bring something, right? These days a lot of people offer to bring something to contribute to the meal - a bottle of wine, dessert, whatever - though a small plant or some other random gift is normal too. We always get asked (and we always ask) “What can we bring?” and normally we (they) always answer “Nothing, no worries!” and then they (we) say in return, “too bad, we’re bringing something, so what can it be?” etc etc. 

It’s all just customary. It’s all expected. Everyone knows the answer, it’s just like reaching for your wallet when you know the other person is paying - it’s a gesture. So since coming to Colorado Zach and I have been toying with a new tradition/concept/rule for when we host dinner parties. And it kind of turns this whole social nicety on its head.

Now we say, “well, you can bring a can of food for donating to the food pantry.”

See here’s the thing. Here we are, average middle class guys, inviting other average middle class (and upper middle class) friends over for dinner (or vice versa), to enjoy a nice meal. That meal can take an hour to prepare, depending on how adventurous I’m feeling. It can also cost $50 - $100, depending on the ingredients, wine, and cheese assortment of the night.

So if we’re spending all that time and money entertaining people who have food in their own refrigerators and roofs over their heads, isn’t it a bit, I dunno, shameful? to forget those who can’t feed their families every day or sleep outside? 

Ergo, our little social experiment. We’ve done it very casually so far; we haven’t asked everyone who’s come over to do it, and we’re defaulting to suggesting it only when someone asks what they can bring. The reaction has been mixed: 

  • Two couples brought many cans or other dry goods. It was surprising, actually. 
  • One couple offered to bring something, we declined with the proviso they could bring a can of food, and they chose not to (no biggie, just interesting). 
  • One couple was a bit bemused, but brought something anyway. 
  • One couple opted to make a donation to some other nonprofit in lieu of bringing something. I assume they did/will, whatever works! 

Then we match the donation from something in our own pantry and/or do so whenever we host or go over to someone’s place. 

It’s not much. It’s just a gesture. But as long as we’re making social gestures to each other for our own dinner parties, why shouldn’t those gestures make us remember those who can’t host dinner parties? 


©2012 Jeof Oyster. Design elements adapted/borrowed from Dave who recycled a theme by Max.